Famous Hairstyles

Hairstyle history is rich, but it wasn’t until the mid 1920’s that women became influenced by fashion trends and the famous hairstyles we’re familiar with today began to emerge. Prior to the 1920’s, it was only fashionable for a woman to wear her hair long but usually upswept in public. During the Victorian era, dress was prim and proper with long sleeves, full skirts, and high necklines. Hairstyles followed suit, always neatly upswept in its proper place, taken down only at night to be brushed.





Along came the ‘20s decade and women found an increasing need for convenience and comfort, not only in their clothing, but their hair. When the hemline on their skirts began to shorten, so did their hair. It was in this era that the famous hairstyle known as the bob first emerged. During this time, to give a more feminine look to the short bob, hair was set and dried in finger waves and finished with pin curls. Hair was also frequently adorned with hair clips, feathers and beads for a more formal look.

Variations of this hairstyle were created and in the 1940’s hairstyle trends changed forever as Hollywood began to heavily influence style. Veronica Lake’s sexy shoulder-length swirls that swept over one eye was the envy of all fashion-conscious women. Steadily, the entertainment industry became the strongest influence in fashion and hairstyles. By the 1950’s, the curious beehive hairstyle was born and in all its variations, bouffant hair was never so stylish as worn by former first lady, Jackie ‘O.

Other famous hairstyles that have emerged over the years became best known sometimes even by the name of their originator. For example, who doesn’t know what a Farrah Fawcett hair do looks like? Dorothy Hamill was another icon who inspired a familiar famous hairstyle. Today, hairstylists everywhere are all too familiar with clients who parallel their hairstyle needs to famous hairstyles worn by those in the spotlight. The most frequently used comparison in recent times is none other than Jennifer Aniston.